Parkville man frustrated with city over lack of information about land development

Parkville man frustrated with city over lack of information about land development

Parkville City Hall.

(KCTV5 News)

PARKVILLE, MO (KCTV) — A resident in Parkville is pushing back against the city government and, after months of asking for information, they’ve asked the state to step in.

Less than 7,000 people live in Parkville, but the small town just north of the KC city limit is trying to grow.

At the end of 2018, the city approved a plan for grassland near I-435 and 45 Highway.

“The development that was approved is consistent with the city’s master plan that has been in place for many years,” said Joe Parente, Parkville City Administrator.

However, one resident is not happy.

“He’s just had enough, yeah,” said Eddie Greim, the attorney for Jason Maki. “I think they realized this was a controversial development and they wanted to move quietly and quickly through."

Maki lives near the land that will be developed soon. He has also filed more than 20 Sunshine Law requests to learn more about why Parkville decided to build there.

“There was concern that there was discussion going on behind the scenes,” Greim said.

Parente told KCTV5 News that wasn’t happening.

“These were just informational meetings,” Parente said. “The board did not engage in discussing or decision making or anything like that.”

However, when we sat down and looked at the paperwork, we found an email from Parente specifically saying to meet in small groups.

If every alderman in Parkville met at the same time and in the same place, they would have had quorum. A quorum is just a majority.

For example, if there are five people who are elected officials and they meet, the meeting would be subject to the Sunshine Law because they are all there and they could vote.

However, if three of those five people leave, the remaining two can’t hold a vote because they don’t have a quorum .

Now, the Missouri attorney general is investigating. Parente said they just handed over more than 50,000 records.

“A lot of these responses were provided,” Parente said. “So, some of those complaints are moot, in our view, and we’re going to respond that way.”

“I mean, it’s part of the playbook for people that want to hide things and that’s what they’re following,” Greim said, with regard to the delay.

Several of the alderman and the mayor, Nan Johnson, are up for reelection on Tuesday, April 2.

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